Gypsy Moth Aerial Spraying in mid-June 2015 in Several Southwestern Virginia Counties

Following are the hyperlinked headline and an excerpt from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) 6/5/15 news release on aerial spraying for Gypsy Moth in several southwestern Virginia counties from June 15-18, 2015.  This and other news releases from VDACS are available online at http://vdacs.virginia.gov/news/press.shtml.

Gypsy Moth Aerial Treatments Begin June 15 in Bland, Buchanan, Carroll, Grayson, Russell, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, and Wythe Counties, 6/5/15.

Excerpt: “The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the United States Department of Agriculture/Forest Service are cooperating in an aerial insecticide application project to suppress and/or eradicate small isolated infestations of the gypsy moth. The treatments [were] scheduled for June 15-18 in the counties of Bland, Buchanan, Carroll, Grayson, Russell, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, and Wythe.  Treatment areas in these counties [included the following]:

Bland County – Brushy Mountain and Lynn Camp Mountain near the community of Ceres;
Buchanan County – Jewell Ridge area;
Carroll County – Near the communities of Fries, Iron Mountain and Farmers Mountain;
Grayson County – Near the communities of Fries and Iron Mountain;
Russell County – Clinch Mountain Wildlife Management Area;
Smyth County – Near the town of Saltville in the Poore Valley area and the Clinch Mountain Wildlife Management Area;
Tazewell County – Clinch Mountain Wildlife Management Area, Stony Ridge in North Tazewell and the Jewell Ridge area;
Washington County – Near the town of Saltville in the Poore Valley area and the Clinch Mountain Wildlife Management Area;
Wythe County – Near the community of Ivanhoe around Ewing Mountain.

“The treatments are part of the Gypsy Moth Slow the Spread program. Treatment is necessary because the leaf-eating gypsy moth caterpillar can cause dramatic devastation in Virginia’s forests.  These invasive pests are voracious eaters and can completely defoliate entire trees. …The applications [were] conducted using airplanes during daylight hours, weather permitting. …The treatment [consisted] of one application of the gypsy moth mating disruption pheromone Hercon Disrupt II®.  The pheromone hampers the ability of the male gypsy moth to find and mate a female gypsy moth. Information on the Hercon Disrupt II can be found on the manufacturer’s Web site [http://www.herconenviron.com/].

“Information on the gypsy moth and the mating disruption treatments can be found on the [Slow the Spread Web site, at http://www.gmsts.org/index.html], or by contacting the VDACS Gypsy Moth Slow the Spread Office at (540) 394-2507.”

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