U.S. Geological Survey Guide to Help Native Americans and Alaska Natives Identify Harmful Algal Blooms; Publication Announced Sept. 15, 2015

On September 15, 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announced publication of Field and Laboratory Guide to Freshwater Cyanobacteria Harmful Algal Blooms for Native American and Alaska Native Communities.

The 44-page publication is designed specifically to help Native American and Alaska Native communities become aware of toxic algae and be able to identify blooms of those algae.  As stated by the USGS’ news release on the publication, “Harmful algal blooms that are dominated by certain cyanobacteria are known to produce a variety of toxins that can negatively affect fish, wildlife and people. Exposure to these toxins can cause a range of effects from simple skin rashes to liver and nerve damage and even death, although rarely in people.”  While targeted to native communities that rely on fisheries, the publication’s information and color photos are useful for anyone who comes into contact with surface waters or harvests fish or shellfish.

The USGS’ news release on the publication is available online at http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=4331&from=news_side#.VfhBnZcXfBE, and the publication is available online at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20151164.  For more information, contact lead author Barry Rosen, USGS Caribbean-Florida Water Science Center, 12703 Research Parkway, Orlando, FL 32826; (407) 803-5508; brosen@usgs.gov.

USGS Algae cover

Cover of Field and Laboratory Guide to Freshwater Cyanobacteria Harmful Algal Blooms for Native American and Alaska Native Communities, accessed online at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20151164.

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