Category Archives: Weather

Virginia Precipitation and Stream Flow for the 7-day Period Ending August 23, 2016

Below are images showing precipitation in Virginia and other areas of the southeastern United States, and stream flow in Virginia, over the seven-day period ending August 23, 2016 (information available as of August 24).  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing precipitation and stream-flow information and images. For the current month’s other weekly reports on stream flow and precipitation, please see the News Grouper posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Virginia+Precipitation.  For monthly reviews of precipitation, stream flow, and drought, please see the posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Monthly+Water+Status.  For more information on current and historical surface-water and groundwater conditions in Virginia, please see the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Virginia Science Center’s Web site, http://va.water.usgs.gov/.

Aug 2016 Gage - Graysontown Jul15 2012 by Will Stacy August 2016 Gaging Station of the Month: On Little River (New River/Gulf of Mexico basin) between Snowville (Pulaski County) and Graysontown (Montgomery County), July 15, 2012.  Photo courtesy of Will Stacy.

Precipitation

The following two color-coded maps show southeastern U.S. precipitation amounts (top map) and the percent of normal precipitation compared to normal for this period of the year (bottom map) over the seven-day period ending August 23, 2016.  The maps were accessed from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Southeast Regional Climate Center, located at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill; online at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps.  As of that date, these data were provisional (needing to be verified for accuracy and subject to possible revision).

Precip Aug23Precip perc Aug23

Another source of precipitation data is the National Weather Service’s Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, http://water.weather.gov/precip/, provides maps showing precipitation nationwide or by state for specific days, months, or years.  The site also has the capability to show county boundaries, and other map layers available include river flood forecasts and current flood/severe weather warnings.  Please note that UTC, the time shown on the maps at the site, is five hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time and four hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time.

Stream Flow

Seven-day-average Virginia stream flows at different gaging stations as of August 23, 2016, are indicated in the map below, from the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia, accessed online at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa07d&r=va&w=map.  The map’s color-coded dots compare the previous week’s average stream flows to the normal flow levels for that week over the historical record for each gaging station.  The color codes/percentile classes used by USGS are as shown in the chart following the map.

Streams Aug23KEEP on deskto - Stream flow code graph

Virginia Precipitation and Stream Flow for the 7-day Period Ending August 16, 2016, Plus a Mid-Month Drought Assessment

Below are images showing precipitation in Virginia and other areas of the southeastern United States, and stream flow in Virginia, over the seven-day period ending August 16, 2016 (information available as of August 17).  Also below is the Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force’s daily map showing the status of several drought indicators in different Virginia regions, as of August 17.  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing precipitation and stream-flow information and images.

For the current month’s other weekly reports on stream flow and precipitation, please see the News Grouper posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Virginia+Precipitation.

For monthly reviews of precipitation, stream flow, and drought, please see the posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Monthly+Water+Status.

For more information on current and historical surface-water and groundwater conditions in Virginia, please see the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Virginia Science Center’s Web site, http://va.water.usgs.gov/.

Aug 2016 Gage - Graysontown Jul15 2012 by Will Stacy August 2016 Gaging Station of the Month: On Little River (New River/Gulf of Mexico basin) between Snowville (Pulaski County) and Graysontown (Montgomery County), July 15, 2012.  Photo courtesy of Will Stacy.

Precipitation

The following two color-coded maps show southeastern U.S. precipitation amounts (top map) and the percent of normal precipitation compared to normal for this period of the year (bottom map) over the seven-day period ending August 16, 2016.  The maps were accessed from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Southeast Regional Climate Center, located at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill; online at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps.  As of that date, these data were provisional (needing to be verified for accuracy and subject to possible revision).

Precip Aug 16

PrecippercAug16

Another source of precipitation data is the National Weather Service’s Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, http://water.weather.gov/precip/, provides maps showing precipitation nationwide or by state for specific days, months, or years.  The site also has the capability to show county boundaries, and other map layers available include river flood forecasts and current flood/severe weather warnings.  Please note that UTC, the time shown on the maps at the site, is five hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time and four hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time.

Stream Flow

Seven-day-average Virginia stream flows at different gaging stations as of August 16, 2016, are indicated in the map below, from the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia, accessed online at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa07d&r=va&w=map.  The map’s color-coded dots compare the previous week’s average stream flows to the normal flow levels for that week over the historical record for each gaging station.  The color codes/percentile classes used by USGS are as shown in the chart following the map.

Streams Aug16

KEEP on deskto - Stream flow code graph

Mid-month Drought Status Update

The Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force (DMTF), a collaboration of state and federal agencies, issued its latest Virginia drought-status report on July 19, 2016 (the latest available as of August 17).  The report is available at the DMTF Web site, http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx.  The Task Force was scheduled to meet and report again on August 11, 2016.

The Task Force also produces a daily map rating drought-status indicators.  Shown below is the August 17, 2016, map.  The status-indicator abbreviations on that map are as follows: GW = groundwater levels, Prcp = precipitation deficits, Res = reservoir storage, and Flow = stream flow conditions.  For each region of Virginia, the indicators are color coded for “normal,” “watch,” “warning,” or “emergency conditions.”  Any given day’s current map and more information on drought status in Virginia are available the Task Force Web site, http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx.

VA Drought Aug17

Flooding in Louisiana in August 2016 – Information Sources

From August 11-14, 2016, a low-pressure system—described by weather professionals similar to an inland tropical depression—generated over two feet of rain in parts of Louisiana—with over 31 inches recorded in Watson, La.  The system also brought as much as 22 inches to parts of Mississippi, 14 inches to parts of Florida, and several inches to several other states from Texas to Michigan.  In Louisiana, the rainfall resulted in flooding that caused at least 13 deaths (as of 8/18/16, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune), damaged tens of thousands of homes, and required rescues of tens of thousands of people.

Following are several sources of information on the events, as of August 16, 2016.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), “Louisiana Severe Storms and Flooding (DR-4277),” online at http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4277?utm_source=hp_promo&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=femagov_hp.

Louisiana Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, online at http://emergency.louisiana.gov/.

Louisiana Governor’s Office, “Resources for Flood Victims” (8/20/16), online at http://gov.louisiana.gov/news/resources-for-flood-victims.

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center (College Park, Md.), “Storm Summary Number 16 for Mississippi and Ohio Valley to Upper Great Lakes Heavy Rainfall,” 8/16/16, online at http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/discussions/nfdscc2.html.

National Weather Service/Advanced Hydrologic Prediction System, “River Observations” and “River Forecasts,” online at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/.

NBC News, “Louisiana Flooding Far From Over Despite Expected Respite From Rain,” 8/15/16, online at http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/louisiana-flooding-far-over-despite-expected-respite-rain-n630771.

New Orleans Times-Picayune, “Louisiana Flooding,” online at http://topics.nola.com/tag/louisiana%20flooding/.  Links to other newspapers, organized by state, are available online at http://www.onlinenewspapers.com/usstate/usatable.htm.

PBS NewsHour:
“News Wrap: Louisiana flooding worsens; crews gain ground on California wildfire,” 8/17/16, online at http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/news-wrap-louisiana-flooding-worsens-crews-gain-ground-california-wildfire/;
“Obama surveys Louisiana flood damage; for hardest hit, it’s a long road ahead,” 8/23/16, online at http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/obama-surveys-louisiana-flood-damage-hardest-hit-long-road-ahead/.

The Weather Channel:
“Why the Louisiana Flood Happened, and 4 Other Things to Know,” 8/15/16, online at https://weather.com/storms/severe/news/louisiana-flooding-why-it-happened-things-to-know;
“Historic August 2016 Flooding in Louisiana After 2+ Feet of Rain Sends Rivers to Record Levels (RECAP),” online at https://weather.com/forecast/regional/news/rain-flood-threat-south-mississippi-ohio-valley.

 

Virginia Precipitation and Stream Flow for the 7-day Period Ending August 9, 2016

Below are images showing precipitation in Virginia and other areas of the southeastern United States, and stream flow in Virginia, over the seven-day period ending August 9, 2016 (information available as of August 10).  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing precipitation and stream-flow information and images.

For the current month’s other weekly reports on stream flow and precipitation, please see the News Grouper posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Virginia+Precipitation.

For monthly reviews of precipitation, stream flow, and drought, please see the posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Monthly+Water+Status.

For more information on current and historical surface-water and groundwater conditions in Virginia, please see the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Virginia Science Center’s Web site, http://va.water.usgs.gov/.

Aug 2016 Gage - Graysontown Jul15 2012 by Will Stacy August 2016 Gaging Station of the Month: On Little River (New River/Gulf of Mexico basin) between Snowville (Pulaski County) and Graysontown (Montgomery County), July 15, 2012.  Photo courtesy of Will Stacy.

Precipitation

The following two color-coded maps show southeastern U.S. precipitation amounts (top map) and the percent of normal precipitation compared to normal for this period of the year (bottom map) over the seven-day period ending August 9, 2016.  The maps were accessed from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Southeast Regional Climate Center, located at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill; online at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps.  As of that date, these data were provisional (needing to be verified for accuracy and subject to possible revision).

Precip Aug9Precip Perc Aug9

Another source of precipitation data is the National Weather Service’s Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, http://water.weather.gov/precip/, provides maps showing precipitation nationwide or by state for specific days, months, or years.  The site also has the capability to show county boundaries, and other map layers available include river flood forecasts and current flood/severe weather warnings.  Please note that UTC, the time shown on the maps at the site, is five hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time and four hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time.

Stream Flow

Seven-day-average Virginia stream flows at different gaging stations as of August 9, 2016, are indicated in the map below, from the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia, accessed online at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa07d&r=va&w=map.  The map’s color-coded dots compare the previous week’s average stream flows to the normal flow levels for that week over the historical record for each gaging station.  The color codes/percentile classes used by USGS are as shown in the chart following the map.

Streams Aug9KEEP on deskto - Stream flow code graph

 

 

July 2016 Atlantic Tropical Storm Summary from the National Hurricane Center Issued August 1, 2016

On August 1, 2016, the National Hurricane Center issued its latest monthly report on the Atlantic tropical storm season; that report is available online at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/MIATWSAT.shtml.  Following is an excerpt from that report: “No tropical cyclones formed in the Atlantic basin in July.   Based on a 30-year (1981-2010) climatology, one named storm typically forms in the Atlantic basin in July, with a hurricane forming about once every other year.  In terms of the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE), which measures the combined strength and duration of tropical storms and hurricanes, activity in the Atlantic basin so far in 2016 is above normal.”

Also from the report for July 2016, here is the NHC’s list of all tropical depressions, tropical storms, and hurricanes this year through July, with their dates of occurrence and maximum wind speeds (abbreviations: H = hurricane; MH = major hurricane; TD = tropical depression; TS = tropical storm):

H Alex – Jan. 13-15 – 85 mph
TS Bonnie – May 27-June 4 – 45 mph
TS Colin – June 5-7 – 50 mph
TS Danielle – June 19-21 – 45 mph

When completed, reports on individual 2016 storms (including tracks) will be available online at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2016&basin=atl.

Below is the Hurricane Center’s graph of preliminary (subject to verification) tracks of Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes in 2016 as of 8/8/16; map accessed at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/MIATWSAT.shtml.
Tropical Storms map July

On Virginia Water Radio for 8-8-16: Some Facts about Flash Flooding

Virginia Water Radio’s latest episode, for the week of August 8, 2016, is “Flash Flooding, Featuring ‘Rain in the Valley’ by The Steel Wheels.”  The 4 min./41 sec. episode, available online http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2016/08/episode-328-8-8-16-flash-flooding.html, focuses on one of the most dangerous kinds of weather-related disasters.  It features music by the Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.


Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

Virginia Water Status Report as of the End of July 2016, Plus a Look at Drought Nationally

Here is the Virginia Water Central News Grouper’s monthly water-status report on precipitation, stream flow, and drought, as of the end of July 2016.  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing the data and maps used in this post.  Icons for precipitation, stream flow, and drought are by George Wills of Blacksburg, Va. (https://www.etsy.com/people/BlacksburgArt).  For previous monthly water status reports, please see this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Water+Status.

Icon - Precip

Here are National Weather Service (NWS) preliminary (still needing verification) precipitation totals for July 2016 at 11 Virginia or near-Virginia locations, along with the “normal” (three-decade average) for this month of the year at each location.  Also shown are the precipitation totals at each location for the previous 12 months and the annual precipitation normals for each location.  All values are in inches.

Location July 2016

Precipitation

 

Monthly Normal August 2015-July 2016 Precipitation

 

Annual Normal
Blacksburg 4.86 4.26 49.89 40.89

 

Bluefield1

 

5.55 4.17 41.55 39.63
Bristol2

 

2.89 4.69 42.14 41.01
Charlottesville3

 

3.00 4.32 45.12 42.71
Danville

 

4.07 4.59 58.12 44.41
Lynchburg

 

6.00 4.36 54.47 41.57
Norfolk

 

10.33 5.14 55.99 46.53
Richmond

 

4.47 4.51 52.20 43.60
Roanoke

 

5.55 4.04 55.53 41.25
Wallops Island4

 

4.87 4.09 49.68 40.84
Washington-Dulles Airport5 3.02 3.67 40.23 41.54

Location notes
1 – The Bluefield location is the Mercer County, W. Va., airport, near the Va.-W.Va. state line.
2- The Bristol location Tri-Cities Airport in Tenn., about 20 miles from Bristol, Va./Tenn.
3 – The Charlottesville location is the (Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.
4 – Wallops Island is in Accomack County.
5 – Washington-Dulles Airport is in Loudoun County.

Precipitation sources:  Climate pages of the following National Weather Service Forecast Offices:
Blacksburg, Va. (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=rnk);
Morristown, Tenn. (http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mrx;
Baltimore-Washington (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=lwx); and
Wakefield, Va. (http://www.nws.noaa.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=akq).

The normal values used by the National Weather Service (NWS) in these provisional reports are based on the period from 1981 to 2010.  The National Climatic Data Center released these normal values in July 2011.  For information on the normal values, see the National Climatic Data Center Web page at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/land-based-station-data/land-based-datasets/climate-normals.

For graphs of precipitation, visit the Southeast Regional Climate Center (Chapel Hill, N.C) at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps, where you can find maps of total precipitation and percent of normal precipitation for the past 7, 30, 60, or 90 days; or the NWS’ Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/precip/ for a map of precipitation nationwide or by state, with capability to show county boundaries, and archives available for specific days, months, or years.  Shown below are the Southeast Regional Climate Center’s preliminary maps of the percent-of-normal precipitation for the previous 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days, through June 30, 2016.

Precip 30Precip 60Precip 90 

Icon - Stream

According to the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia (online at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=mv01d&r=va&w=map), monthly average stream flow values for July 2016 at 151 stream gages in Virginia and just beyond the state border were in the normal range at about 66% of gages, above normal at about 30%, much above normal at about 4%, and below normal at the James River/Kanawha Canal near Richmond.  The color-coded, flow-percentile map for this period is shown below.  The color codes/percentile classes used by USGS to compared flows to historical records for the month are shown in the chart below the map.

Streams July

KEEP on deskto - Stream flow code graph

An overall look at Virginia streamflow conditions is provided in the USGS WaterWatch summary plot of average streamflow conditions.  Below is the summary plot for 88 Virginia sites during the 45-day period ending July 30, 2016, accessed at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?id=pa07d&sid=w__plot&r=va on August 1, 2016.

Stream summary chart Aug 1

Icon - Groundwater

Information on current groundwater levels in Virginia monitoring wells is available from the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System, online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/current/?type=gw; and from the USGS Climate Response Network, online at http://groundwaterwatch.usgs.gov/net/ogwnetwork.asp?ncd=crn (at that page, you can find a national map showing the status of groundwater monitoring wells compared to historical values).

Icon - Drought
DROUGHT IN VIRGINIA

The weekly National Drought Monitor map from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/) for July 26, 2016, showed about 6% of Virginia as “abnormally dry,” covering all or part of about nine northern and northwestern counties along with part of Scott County in far southwestern Virginia.

Drought Monitor categories are as follows:
D0 = abnormally dry;
D1 = moderate drought;
D2 = severe drought;
D3 = extreme drought;
D4 = exceptional drought.

The Drought Monitor notes that it “focuses on broad-scale conditions [and] local conditions may vary.”

For comparison, here are Virginia ratings from previous Drought Monitors from about one month, two months, three months, and one year ago:
6/28/16 – about 3% abnormally dry;
5/31/16 – about 3% abnormally dry;
4/26/16 – about 95% abnormally dry or worse; about 4% in moderate drought;
7/28/15 – drought-free.

The Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force, a collaboration of state and federal agencies, issued its most recent Drought Status Report on July 19, 2016.  A link to the report, along with other current drought-status information, is available online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx.  The Task Force’s reports typically include information from some or all of the following agencies: University of Virginia Climatology Office, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Virginia departments of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Health, and Environmental Quality.  The next report is scheduled for August 11, 2016.

The Drought Monitoring Task Force also produces a daily map rating drought-status indicators.  Shown below is daily map for August 1, 2016.  The status-indicator abbreviations on that map are as follows: GW = groundwater levels, Prcp = precipitation deficits, Res – reservoir storage, and Flow = stream flow conditions.  For each region of Virginia, the indicators are color coded for “normal,” “watch,” “warning,” or “emergency conditions.”  Any given day’s current map and more information on drought status in Virginia are available the Task Force Web site listed above.

Drought VA Aug 1

DROUGHT ELSEWHERE

The July 26, 2016, U.S. Drought Monitor rated 46.1% of the United States (including all or parts of 49 states, plus Puerto Rico) as being abnormally dry or worse.  The Drought Monitor rated 6.0% of the country (including all or parts of 20 states), as being in severe drought or worse (categories D2, D3, and D4).  The highest percentage in the severe-or-worse categories reported by the Drought Monitor since it began in 2000 was 38.5% of the country for the week of August 7, 2012.

The nationwide percentages for abnormally dry or worse (D0-D4) and severe or worse (D2-D4) in the previous three months and one year ago were as follows:
6/28/16 – 40.8% abnormally dry or worse; 4.6% severe drought or worse;
5/31/16 – 29.4% abnormally dry or worse; 3.6% severe drought or worse;
4/26/16 – 37.0% abnormally dry or worse; 5.0% severe drought or worse;
7/28/15 – 48.4% abnormally dry or worse; 15.0% severe drought or worse.

In California, 59.0% of the state was categorized by the July 26 report as being in severe-or-worse drought.  This severe-or-worse percentage—which has been the Drought Monitor rating for California since the week of 5/31/16—is the lowest reported by the Drought Monitor for the Golden State since 53.5% for the week of June 11, 2013.  California’s current drought began in late 2011 to early 2012.

Following are some comments from the July 26, 2016, Drought Monitor on extreme high temperatures seen in several parts of the country in July.

Northeast
“…Daily-record highs for July 23 reached 99°F in Williamsport, PA, and 97°F in Bridgeport, CT.  On July 24-25, Pennsylvania locations such as Reading (96 and 97°F) and Allentown (95°F both days) posted consecutive daily-record highs. All of the major airports in the Washington, D.C., area hit 100°F (and noted daily-record highs) on July 25, marking the first triple-digit heat in all three locations since July 2012.  For several Mid-Atlantic locations, including Newark, NJ (99°F), and Philadelphia, PA (97°F), highs on July 25 broke daily records originally set in 1999….Impacts of the Northeastern drought were obvious in the agricultural sector, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) rating topsoil moisture at least half short to very short on July 24 in Rhode Island (97%), Connecticut (85%), Massachusetts (80%), New Hampshire (70%), Pennsylvania (63%), and New York (54%)….”

Southeast
“… In recent days, triple-digit daily-record highs were reported in Southeastern locations such as Columbia, South Carolina (102°F on July 26), and Athens, Georgia (101°F on July 25).  By July 24, USDA indicated that topsoil moisture ranged from 40 to 74% very short to short in eight states stretching from Texas to South Carolina. …In addition to agricultural effects, Southeastern drought impacts were apparent in low streamflows and beginning to show in some lake levels.  For example, Georgia’s Lake Lanier was 4.40 feet below full pool on July 27, 2016, and 4.07 feet below the level observed 2 years ago, on July 27, 2014.”

Southern Plains
“…On July 25, Midland, Texas, set a July record with its 19th day of triple-digit heat. Previously, Midland had recorded 18 days with high of 100°F or greater in July 1964.  Midland also set a July record with 9 days of 105-degree heat—all from July 3-14—eclipsing its July 1995 standard of 6 days….”

Northern Plains
“…In South Dakota, triple-digit, daily-record highs for July 20 soared to 108°F in Dupree and 107°F in Timber Lake.  On July 24, South Dakota led the nation with 15% of its spring wheat rated in very poor to poor condition, followed by North Dakota at 10%….”

West
“…By July 25, daily-record heat returned to portions of the interior Northwest, where Yakima, Washington, posted a high of 102°F. …Farther south, heat also returned to southern California, where record-setting highs for July 23 rose to 110°F in Riverside and 108°F in Campo. …On July 19, Salt Lake City, Utah, noted its first-ever minimum temperature above the 80-degree mark—the low was 81°F—with records dating to 1874.”

90-DAY DROUGHT OUTLOOK

For a look ahead, the National Weather Service/Climate Prediction Center’s “U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook” is available at http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/sdo_summary.php.  Shown below is the outlook map available on August 1, 2016.

Drought US Outlook