On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 2-18-19: A Sampler of Water Bills in the 2019 Virginia General Assembly

Virginia Water Radio’s episode for the week of February 18, 2019, is “Voting on Water in the 2019 Virginia General Assembly.”  The 5 min./24 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/02/episode-460-2-18-19-voting-on-water-in.html, is the show’s annual episode giving listeners a chance to consider how they’d vote on several water-related bills from the current session of Virginia’s legislature.  The episode features music by the Harrisonburg-Va.-based group The Steel Wheels.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

Virginia Water-related Government Meetings for Feb. 15-Mar. 1, 2019 — Including 2019 Virginia General Assembly Information

For more information, click on underlined meeting dates. Click here for the Commonwealth Calendar listing of all government meetings open to the public, and here for the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall listing of all government meetings of a regulatory nature.

For other events, please see the “Announcements” posts at the Virginia Water Monitoring Council Web site, http://www.vwmc.vwrrc.vt.edu/. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF STATEWIDE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

2/19/19, 9 a.m.: Gas and Oil Board.  At the Russell County Office Building, 139 Highland Drive in Lebanon.

2/20/19, 8:30 a.m.: State Board of Health’s Waterworks Advisory Committee.  At Sydnor Hydro, Inc., 2111 Magnolia Street in Richmond.

2/26/19, 9:30 a.m.: Marine Resources Commission.  At 380 Fenwick Road at Ft. Monroe (adjacent to the City of Hampton).

2/27/19, 9 a.m.: Board of Conservation and Recreation/Scenic Resources Subcommittee.  At the Department of Conservation and Recreation, 600 East Main Street in Richmond.

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VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY WATER-RELATED MEETINGS

For meetings of legislative committees and commissions, see http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?181+oth+MTG.  Links to information about General Assembly commissions, councils, and special interim committees coordinated by the Division of Legislative Services are available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html. 

Started 1/9/19: Virginia General Assembly, Richmond.  Current status is available online at this link; session calendars available at this link.  The 2019 General Assembly convened on January 9 and is scheduled to adjourn on February 23; this is a so-called “short session” (30 days), which is held in all odd-numbered years.  The reconvened (“veto”) session will be held on April 3.  In some years, sessions are extended beyond the scheduled length, particularly for budget discussions (any session may be extended for up to 30 days).  The General Assembly’s main Web page, http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/index.php, offers several useful features, including member lists, session calendars, live video of floor sessions, and information on legislative processes.  The Legislative Information System (LIS) Web site, http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm, provides lists and summaries of all bills, searchable by topic, member, committee, etc.  Live video streams of floor sessions are available at http://virginia-house.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3 for the House and http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3 for the Senate.  Committees are key parts of the General Assembly process. Legislation about water or about activities that can affect water may be assigned to any of several standing committees, most of which meet weekly during the General Assembly session.  As of 2018, live streaming of committee meetings is available.  Information on live streaming of House committee meetings is online at https://publications.virginiageneralassembly.gov/display_publication/209; for Senate committee meetings, online at http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3.

Two committees that receive many (but not all) of the water-related bills are the House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources Committee, which meets weekly on Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m., in House Room 3 of the Capitol, 1000 Bank Street; and the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee, which meets weekly on Thursdays, one-half hour after adjournment of the day’s floor session, in Senate Room A of the Pocahontas Building, 900 East Main Street in Richmond.  Information about all standing committees as of the 2019 session—including membership, meeting times, and legislation being considered—is available online at http://lis.virginia.gov/191/com/COM.HTM.

To express an opinion on legislation, citizens are requested to contact their respective delegate of senator.  If you do not know your representatives or their contact information, you can use the online “Who’s My Legislator” service, available at http://whosmy.virginiageneralassembly.gov/.

You can find members’ contact information at these links:
House of Delegates, at http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/house/members/members.php;
State Senate, at https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/.

The Lobbyist-In-A-Box subscriber service also offers free tracking for up to five bills, and it offers tracking of more than five bills for a fee; visit http://lis.virginia.gov/h015.htm.  For assistance, phone Legislative Automated Systems at (804) 786-9631.

The organization Open Virginia’s Richmond Sunlight Web site, at https://www.richmondsunlight.com/, also offers tools for following the General Assembly and for learning about Virginia law.

Natural Resource-Related Caucus Meetings for this Period

2/18/19, 4 p.m.: Virginia Environment and Renewable Energy Caucus.  200-B Subcommittee Room, Pocahontas Building, 900 East Main Street in Richmond.

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MEETINGS ON OTHER SPECIFIC TOPICS
(topics listed alphabetically) 

Scenic Rivers

2/21/19, 12 p.m.: Historic Falls of the James Scenic River Advisory Board.  At Richmond City Hall, 900 East Broad Street in Richmond.

Water Quality Regulations and Standards

2/26/19, 1 p.m.: State Water Control Board/Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on proposed chlorophyll a criteria for the tidal James River.  At the DEQ’s Piedmont Regional Office, Training Room, 4949-A Cox Road in Glen Allen (Henrico County).  The pertinent section in the Virginia Administrative Code is VAC 25-260-310 bb.  According to the Regulatory Town Hall notice for this meeting,
“[t]he proposed amendments are the result of a comprehensive scientific study overseen by DEQ that focused on chlorophyll-a dynamics and linkages to aquatic life effects in the James River.  Among the most notable changes to the regulation are modified seasonal mean criteria (eight proposed criteria are lower than the existing criteria and two proposed criteria are higher) and new short-duration criteria that protect aquatic life from the effects of toxic algae.  Additionally, new language describing how data should be analyzed and the allowable exceedance frequencies for both sets of criteria will be inserted into the regulation.” The proposal appeared in the Virginia Register of Regulations on January 21, 2019.  More information on this proposed regulatory action is available online at http://townhall.virginia.gov/L/viewaction.cfm?actionid=3522&display=stages.

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 2-11-19 and Presidents Day on Feb. 18: Lincoln and the James River

Virginia Water Radio’s episode for the week of February 11, 2019, is “Abraham Lincoln and the James River.”  The 4 min./27 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/02/episode-459-2-11-19-abraham-lincoln-and.html, commemorates Presidents Day (on February 18) with a revised 2014 episode on the rail-splitter’s 1865 visit to Richmond in the last weeks of the Civil War.  The episode includes part of the Civil War-era song “Richmond is a Hard Road to Travel,” performed by Bobby Horton.

459 Image 4

Statue by Louis Frech of Abraham Lincoln and son Tad, at the Historic Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, Va., placed in 2003 to commemorate Lincoln’s 1865 visit to the captured Confederate capital.  National Park Service photo, accessed online at https://www.nps.gov/rich/learn/historyculture/lincvisit.htm.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

Virginia Water-related Government Meetings for Feb. 8-Feb. 22, 2019; Including 2019 Virginia General Assembly Information

For more information, click on underlined meeting dates. Click here for the Commonwealth Calendar listing of all government meetings open to the public, and here for the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall listing of all government meetings of a regulatory nature. 

For other events, please see the “Announcements” posts at the Virginia Water Monitoring Council Web site, http://www.vwmc.vwrrc.vt.edu/.

REGULAR MEETINGS OF STATEWIDE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

2/12/19, 2 p.m.: Marine Products Board.  At the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, 1208 Greate Road in Gloucester Point (Gloucester County).

2/20/19, 8:30 a.m.: State Board of Health’s Waterworks Advisory Committee.  At Sydnor Hydro, Inc., 2111 Magnolia Street in Richmond.

2/20/19, 10 a.m.: Board for Professional Soil Scientists, Wetland Professionals, and Geologists.  At the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation, 9960 Mayland Drive in Richmond. 

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VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY WATER-RELATED MEETINGS

For meetings of legislative committees and commissions, see http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?181+oth+MTG.  Links to information about General Assembly commissions, councils, and special interim committees coordinated by the Division of Legislative Services are available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html.

Started 1/9/19: Virginia General Assembly, Richmond.  Current status is available online at this link; session calendars available at this link.  The 2019 General Assembly convenes on January 9 and is scheduled to adjourn on February 23; this is a so-called “short session” (30 days), which is held in all odd-numbered years.  The reconvened (“veto”) session will be held on April 3.  In some years, sessions are extended beyond the scheduled length, particularly for budget discussions (any session may be extended for up to 30 days).  The General Assembly’s main Web page, http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/index.php, offers several useful features, including member lists, session calendars, live video of floor sessions, and information on legislative processes.  The Legislative Information System (LIS) Web site, http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm, provides lists and summaries of all bills, searchable by topic, member, committee, etc.  Live video streams of floor sessions are available at http://virginia-house.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3 for the House and http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3 for the Senate.  Committees are key parts of the General Assembly process. Legislation about water or about activities that can affect water may be assigned to any of several standing committees, most of which meet weekly during the General Assembly session.  As of 2018, live streaming of committee meetings is available.  Information on live streaming of House committee meetings is online at https://publications.virginiageneralassembly.gov/display_publication/209; for Senate committee meetings, online at http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3.

Two committees that receive many (but not all) of the water-related bills are the House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources Committee, which meets weekly on Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m., in House Room 3 of the Capitol, 1000 Bank Street; and the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee, which meets weekly on Thursdays, one-half hour after adjournment of the day’s floor session, in Senate Room A of the Pocahontas Building, 900 East Main Street in Richmond.  Information about all standing committees as of the 2019 session—including membership, meeting times, and legislation being considered—is available online at http://lis.virginia.gov/191/com/COM.HTM.

To express an opinion on legislation, citizens are requested to contact their respective delegate of senator.  If you do not know your representatives or their contact information, you can use the online “Who’s My Legislator” service, available at http://whosmy.virginiageneralassembly.gov/.

You can find members’ contact information at these links:
House of Delegates, at http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/house/members/members.php;
State Senate, at https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/.

The Lobbyist-In-A-Box subscriber service also offers free tracking for up to five bills, and it offers tracking of more than five bills for a fee; visit http://lis.virginia.gov/h015.htm.  For assistance, phone Legislative Automated Systems at (804) 786-9631.

The organization Open Virginia’s Richmond Sunlight Web site, at https://www.richmondsunlight.com/, also offers tools for following the General Assembly and for learning about Virginia law.

Relevant Subcommittee Meetings for this Period

2/11/19, 4:30 p.m.: House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources Committee/Subcommittee #1.  400-B Subcommittee Room, Pocahontas Building, 900 East Main Street in Richmond.

Natural Resource-Related Caucus Meetings for this Period

2/11/19, 4 p.m.: Virginia Environment and Renewable Energy Caucus.  200-B Subcommittee Room, Pocahontas Building, 900 East Main Street in Richmond.

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MEETINGS ABOUT TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY LOADS (or TMDLs) for IMPAIRED WATERS

For more information about TMDLs in Virginia, click here for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality TMDL Web site.   TMDL reports are available at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/TMDL/TMDLDevelopment/ApprovedTMDLReports.aspx. 

None during this period.

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MEETINGS ON OTHER SPECIFIC TOPICS
(topics listed alphabetically) 

Land and Watershed Management

2/14/19, 9:30 a.m.: Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) Water Quality Monitoring and Research Workgroup for Salt Management Strategy Development in the Accotink Creek Watershed.  At AlexRenew, 1800 Limerick Street in Alexandria.  According to the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall notice for this meeting, “A chloride TMDL has been developed for the Accotink Creek watershed located in Fairfax County.  Additionally, water quality patterns throughout the Northern Virginia region show that the chloride pollution issues observed in the Accotink Creek watershed are not isolated to that watershed, but instead widespread throughout the region.  Therefore, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in partnership with a broad coalition of stakeholders that make up the SaMS Stakeholder Advisory Committee have begun the development of a comprehensive strategy that aims to provide recommendations for more efficient and effective use of salts during winter weather management.  The purpose of this meeting is to report on follow-up items from the last workgroup meeting, begin to finalize workgroup recommendations, and prepare for the workgroup update at the upcoming 3rd Stakeholder Advisory Committee (SAC) Meeting.”  Materials related to this project are posted online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/SaMS/MeetingMaterials.aspx.

Scenic Rivers

2/21/19, 12 p.m.: Historic Falls of the James Scenic River Advisory Board.  At Richmond City Hall, 900 East Broad Street in Richmond.

Water Quality Regulations and Standards

2/13/19, 10 a.m.: Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public webinar on the draft 2018 Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report.  Registration information for the webinar can be found at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3542169463391934466.  According to the Regulatory Town Hall notice for this Webinar, the Virginia DEQ released the Draft 2018 Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report (Integrated Report) on January 22, 2019, for public comment.  The Integrated Report combines both the 305(b) Water Quality Assessment and the 303(d) Report on Impaired Waters.  Both are required by the Federal Clean Water Act and the Virginia Water Quality Monitoring Information and Restoration Act.  The report will be available for download at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/WaterQualityAssessments.aspx throughout the public comment period, ends February 21, 2019.

Virginia Water Status Report as of the End of January 2019, Plus a Look at Drought Nationally

Here is the Virginia Water Central News Grouper’s monthly water-status report on precipitation, stream flow, and drought, as of end of January 2019.  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing the data and maps used in this post.  Icons for precipitation, stream flow, and drought are by George Wills of Blacksburg, Va. (https://www.etsy.com/people/BlacksburgArt).  For previous monthly water status reports, please see this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Water+Status.

Water status icon precipitation by George Wills

Here are National Weather Service (NWS) preliminary (still needing verification) precipitation totals for January 2019 at 12 Virginia or near-Virginia locations, along with the “normal” (three-decade average) for this month of the year at each location.  Also shown are the precipitation totals at each location for the previous 12 months and the annual precipitation normals for each location.  The values are in inches.

Location January 2019 Observed Monthly Normal February 2018-

January 2019 Observed

Annual Normal
Blacksburg 2.76 3.08 53.18 40.89
Bluefield1 2.40 2.90 50.77 39.63
Bristol2 3.69 3.37 55.96 41.01
Charlottesville3 2.74 2.77 63.82 42.71
Danville 3.84 3.42 68.44 44.41
Lynchburg 2.83 3.14 65.59 41.57
Norfolk 3.81 3.40 56.98 46.53
Reagan National Airport4 3.30 2.81 68.64 39.74
Richmond 2.62 3.04 62.94 43.60
Roanoke 2.33 2.92 62.64 41.25
Wallops Island5 4.20 3.04 47.92 40.84
Washington-Dulles Airport6 3.96 2.68 68.92 41.54

Location notes
1 – The Bluefield location is the Mercer County, W. Va., airport, near the Va.-W.Va. state line.
2- The Bristol location is the Tri-Cities Airport in Tenn., about 20 miles from Bristol, Va./Tenn.
3 – The Charlottesville location is the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.
4 – Reagan National Airport is in Arlington County.
5 – Wallops Island is in Accomack County.
6 – Washington-Dulles Airport is in Loudoun County.

Precipitation sources:  Climate pages of the following National Weather Service Forecast Offices:
Blacksburg, Va. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=rnk);
Morristown, Tenn. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mrx);
Baltimore-Washington (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=lwx); and
Wakefield, Va. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=akq).

The normal values used by the National Weather Service (NWS) in these provisional reports are based on the period from 1981 to 2010.  The National Climatic Data Center released these normal values in July 2011.  For information on the normal values, see the National Climatic Data Center Web page at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/land-based-station-data/land-based-datasets/climate-normals.

For graphs of precipitation, visit the High Plains Regional Climate Center at https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps), where you can find maps of total precipitation and percent of normal precipitation for the past 7, 30, 60, or 90 days for all U.S. regions; or the NWS’ Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/precip/ for a map of precipitation nationwide or by state, with capability to show county boundaries, and archives available for specific days, months, or years.  Shown below are the preliminary maps of the percent-of-normal precipitation for the southeastern [DEC: continental] United States for the previous 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days, and for Virginia for the previous 30 days, all through February 2, 2019.

PrecipPerc30Feb2PrecipPerc60Feb2PrecipPerc90Feb2PrecipPercVA30Feb2

Water status icon stream flow by George Wills
According to the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia (online at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=mv01d&r=va&w=map), monthly average stream flow values for January 2019 at 154 stream gages in Virginia and just beyond the state border were as follows, compared to the historical range for each given gage:

within the normal historical range – about 8% of gages;
below normal – one gage;
above normal – about 47% of gages;
much above normal (or higher) – about 44% of gages.

Shown below is the color-coded, flow-percentile map for this period, accessed at the Web site given in the paragraph above.  The chart below the map shows the color codes/percentile classes used by USGS to compared flows to historical records for the month.

Streams map Jan2019

An overall look at Virginia streamflow conditions is provided in the USGS WaterWatch summary plot of daily average streamflow conditions, compared to historical records for any given date.  Below is the summary plot for 88 Virginia sites during the 45-day period ending January 31, 2019, accessed on February 3, 2019, at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?id=pa01d&sid=w__plot&r=va.

Streams Plot Feb2

Water status icons groundwater by George Wills

Information on current groundwater levels in Virginia monitoring wells is available from the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System, online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/current/?type=gw; and from the USGS Climate Response Network, online at http://groundwaterwatch.usgs.gov/net/ogwnetwork.asp?ncd=crn (at that page, you can find a national map showing the status of groundwater monitoring wells compared to historical values).

Water status icon drought watch by George Wills DROUGHT IN VIRGINIA

The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor map from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/) for January 29, 2019, categorized Virginia as drought-free.  The Commonwealth has been essentially drought-free since the June 5, 2018, Drought Monitor report, except for a 0.57% abnormally dry rating in the July 17, 2018, report and a 0.01% abnormally dry rating in the June 26, 2018, report.

Drought Monitor categories are as follows:
D0 = abnormally dry;
D1 = moderate drought;
D2 = severe drought;
D3 = extreme drought;
D4 = exceptional drought.

The Drought Monitor notes that it “focuses on broad-scale conditions [and] local conditions may vary.”

For comparison, here are Virginia ratings from previous Drought Monitors from about one month, two months, three months, and one year ago:
1/1/19 – drought-free;
11/27/18 – drought-free;
10/30/18 – drought-free;
1/30/18 – 97.9% abnormally dry or worse; 48.6% moderate drought or worse; 2.9% severe drought.

In June 2018, the Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force (DMTF), a collaboration of state and federal agencies, issued its most recent report.  At that time, the DMTF stated that is would monitor conditions and meet again when conditions warrant another report.  A link to the June 2018 report, along with other current drought-status information, is available online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx.  The DMTF’s reports typically include information from some or all of the following agencies: University of Virginia Climatology Office, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Virginia departments of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Health, and Environmental Quality.  Shown below is a map identifying the Drought Evaluation Regions used by the DMTF.
Drought Evaluation Regions

DROUGHT ELSEWHERE

The January 29, 2019, U.S. Drought Monitor categorized about 26.1% of the United States (including all or parts of 24 states plus Puerto Rico) as being abnormally dry or worse.  The Drought Monitor categorized about 5.8% of the country (including parts of 10 states) as being in severe drought or worse (categories D2, D3, and D4.  (The highest percentage in the severe-or-worse categories reported by the Drought Monitor since it began in 2000 was 38.5% of the country for the week of August 7, 2012.)

The nationwide percentages for abnormally dry or worse (categories D0-D4) and severe or worse (categories D2-D4) in the previous three months and one year ago were as follows:
1/1/19 – 26.9% abnormally dry or worse; 9.1% severe drought or worse;
11/27/18 – 29.4% abnormally dry or worse; 9.9% severe drought or worse;
10/30/18 – 31.5% abnormally dry or worse; 10.8% severe drought or worse;
1/30/18 – 61.9% abnormally dry or worse; 14.4% severe drought or worse.

The following state had 50% or more of its land area categorized by the January 29 Drought Monitor in severe-or-worse drought:
Oregon – 74%;

90-DAY DROUGHT OUTLOOK

For a look ahead, the National Weather Service/Climate Prediction Center’s “U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook” is available at http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/sdo_summary.php.  Shown below is the outlook map available on February 3, 2019.
Drought Outlook Feb3

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 2-4-19: Nonesuch on the James River and Richmond’s Beginnings

Virginia Water Radio’s episode for the week of February 4, 2019, is “Nonesuch in the History of Richmond’s James River Location.”  The 5 min./1 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/02/episode-458-2-4-19-nonesuch-in-history.html, focuses on the early 1600s settlement of Nonesuch along the James River and its evolution within the larger history of Richmond.  The episode includes part of a traditional English dance tune by the name of “Nonesuch,” performed by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 1-28-19: A Focus on Ferries from a Potomac River Starting Point

Virginia Water Radio’s episode for the week of January 28, 2019, is “Catching the Ferry at the Potomac River.”  The 4 min./25 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/01/episode-457-1-28-19-catching-ferry-at.html, starts with sounds from a crossing of the Potomac at White’s Ferry and then explores the widespread use of ferries.  The episode includes part of “Ferry Song” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va.

457 image 2 ferry tolls sign used radio 457
Approach to White’s Ferry boarding site on the Potomac River in Montgomery County, Md., January 11, 2019.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!