Virginia Water-related Government Meetings for May 23-June 7, 2019

For more information, click on underlined meeting dates. Click here for the Commonwealth Calendar listing of all government meetings open to the public, and here for the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall listing of all government meetings of a regulatory nature.

 For other events, please see the “Announcements” posts at the Virginia Water Monitoring Council Web site, http://www.vwmc.vwrrc.vt.edu/.

REGULAR MEETINGS OF STATEWIDE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

5/23/19, 9 a.m.: Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services.  At the Patrick Henry Building, 1111 East Broad Street in Richmond.

5/23/19, 1 p.m.: Outdoors Foundation’s Energy and Infrastructure Committee.  At 600 East Main Street in Richmond.

5/28/19, 9:30 a.m.: Marine Resources Commission.  At 380 Fenwick Road in Ft. Monroe (adjacent to the City of Hampton).

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Board for Professional Soil Scientists, Wetland Professionals, and Geologists.  At the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation, 9960 Mayland Drive in Richmond.

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Board of Game and Inland Fisheries/Boat and Law Enforcement Committee; 5/29/19, 1 p.m.: Finance, Audit and Compliance Committee; 5/29/19, 3 p.m.: Education, Planning and Outreach Committee; 5/30/19, 9 a.m.: full Board.  All meetings at the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, 7870 Villa Park Drive in Henrico County.

*          *          *

VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY WATER-RELATED MEETINGS

For meetings of legislative committees and commissions, see http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?181+oth+MTG.  Links to information about General Assembly commissions, councils, and special interim committees coordinated by the Division of Legislative Services are available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html. 

None during this period. 

*          *          *

MEETINGS ABOUT TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY LOADS (or TMDLs) for IMPAIRED WATERS

For more information about TMDLs in Virginia, click here for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality TMDL Web site.   TMDL reports are available at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/TMDL/TMDLDevelopment/ApprovedTMDLReports.aspx. 

5/29/19, 10: 30 a.m., on the TDML implementation plan for chloride impairments in Accotink Creek, located in the Potomac River watershed, in Fairfax County and the City of Fairfax.  At Griffith Water Treatment Plant, 9600 Ox Road in Lorton.  According to the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall notice for the 5/29/19 meeting, “This is a notice for the third meeting of the Stakeholder Advisory Committee (SAC) for development of the Salt Management Strategy (SaMS).  Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for chloride associated with salt application from snow and ice management have been developed for the Accotink Creek watershed, located in Fairfax County and the City of Fairfax.  These TMDLs were approved 5/23/18.  The SaMS is intended to assist in the implementation of the Accotink Creek chloride TMDLs.  The SaMS aims to prepare a strategy that is capable of achieving the target chloride (salt) loads identified in the Accotink Creek TMDLs and that proactively addresses salt application in the broader surrounding region.  The project area for the SaMS includes Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Alexandria, Manassas, Manassas Park, Falls Church, and Fairfax.”

*          *          *

MEETINGS ON OTHER SPECIFIC TOPICS
(topics listed alphabetically) 

Agriculture or Forestry

5/28/19, 10 a.m.: Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Agricultural Best Management Practices Cost-share Program Technical Advisory Committee/Animal Waste Subcommittee.  At the Virginia Department of Forestry, 900 Natural Resources Drive in Charlottesville.  On 6/5/19, the Programmatic Subcommittee meets at the Monacan Soil and Water Conservation District office, 2478 Dogtown Road in Goochland (Goochland County).

Dams

5/23/19, 9:30 a.m.: Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Districts’ Dam Owner Workgroup.  At the Augusta County Government Center, 75 Government Center Lane in Verona.

Energy – Fossil Fuels

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) ad hoc work group on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure.  At the Bank of America Building, 1111 East Main Street in Richmond.  This group was established to discuss approaches for addressing methane from leakage from natural gas infrastructure.  More information is available on the DEQ’s “Greenhouse Gases” Web page, https://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Air/GreenhouseGasPlan.aspx.

Land and Watershed Management

5/30/19, 10 a.m.: Marine Resources Commission public comment meeting regarding SJR 309 and submerged fiber optic cable protection.  At 380 Fenwick Road in Ft. Monroe (adjacent to the City of Hampton).  According to the Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) 309, passed by the 2019 Virginia General Assembly, requests the Commission to “study the feasibility of creating protection zones for submerged fiber optic cables located along Virginia’s shores.”  LIS Information on the joint resolution is available online at http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?191+sum+SJ309.

Waste Management – Hazardous Waste

5/30/19, 9:30 a.m.: Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Webinar on making hazardous waste determinations.  On 5/30/19, 1 p.m., DEQ will hold a Webinar on such determinations for health care facilities.  More information is available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/LandProtectionRevitalization/SolidHazardousWasteRegulatoryPrograms/HazardousWaste/HazardousWasteTrainingandEducationOpportunities.aspx.

Waste Management – Solid Waste

6/5/19, 6 p.m.: Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on a draft permit modification for the New River Resource Authority (NRRA) Regional Solid Waste Management Facility.  At the New River Resource Authority Administration Building, (Asbury Starnes room), 7100 Cloyd’s Mountain Road in Dublin (Pulaski County).  The proposed modification would allow an increase in landfill capacity from 14,036,005 cubic yards to 16,156,338.

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 5-20-19: Big Run and Other Waters of Shenandoah National Park

Virginia Water Radio’s latest episode, for the week of May 20, 2019, is “Water and Shenandoah National Park, Featuring ‘Big Run Thrives.’”  The 4 min./30 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/05/episode-473-5-20-19-water-in-shenandoah.html, explores the water in one of Virginia’s natural treasures.  The episode features music by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

Virginia Water-related Government Meetings for May 17-May 31, 2019

For more information, click on underlined meeting dates. Click here for the Commonwealth Calendar listing of all government meetings open to the public, and here for the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall listing of all government meetings of a regulatory nature.

For other events, please see the “Announcements” posts at the Virginia Water Monitoring Council Web site, http://www.vwmc.vwrrc.vt.edu/. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF STATEWIDE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

5/21/19, 9 a.m.: Gas and Oil Board.  At the Russell County Office Building, 139 Highland Drive in Lebanon.

5/22/19, 9:30 a.m.: Soil and Water Conservation Board.  At Pocahontas State Park, Swift Creek Dining Hall, 10301 State Park Road in Chesterfield (Chesterfield County).

5/23/19, 9 a.m.: Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services.  At the Patrick Henry Building, 1111 East Broad Street in Richmond.

5/23/19, 1 p.m.: Outdoors Foundation’s Energy and Infrastructure Committee.  At 600 East Main Street in Richmond.

5/28/19, 9:30 a.m.: Marine Resources Commission.  At 380 Fenwick Road in Ft. Monroe (adjacent to the City of Hampton).

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Board for Professional Soil Scientists, Wetland Professionals, and Geologists.  At the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation, 9960 Mayland Drive in Richmond.

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Board of Game and Inland Fisheries/Boat and Law Enforcement Committee; 5/29/19, 1 p.m.: Finance, Audit and Compliance Committee; 5/29/19, 3 p.m.: Education, Planning and Outreach Committee; 5/30/19, 9 a.m.: full Board.  All meetings at the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, 7870 Villa Park Drive in Henrico County.

*          *          *

VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY WATER-RELATED MEETINGS

For meetings of legislative committees and commissions, see http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?181+oth+MTG.  Links to information about General Assembly commissions, councils, and special interim committees coordinated by the Division of Legislative Services are available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html. 

5/20/19, 1 p.m.: Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding.  At the Capitol, House Room 3, 1000 Bank Street in Richmond. 

*          *          *

MEETINGS ABOUT TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY LOADS (or TMDLs) for IMPAIRED WATERS

For more information about TMDLs in Virginia, click here for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality TMDL Web site.   TMDL reports are available at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/TMDL/TMDLDevelopment/ApprovedTMDLReports.aspx. 

5/29/19, 10: 30 a.m., on the TDML implementation plan for chloride impairments in Accotink Creek, located in the Potomac River watershed, in Fairfax County and the City of Fairfax.  At Griffith Water Treatment Plant, 9600 Ox Road in Lorton (Fairfax County).  According to the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall notice for the 5/29/19 meeting, “This is a notice for the third meeting of the Stakeholder Advisory Committee (SAC) for development of the Salt Management Strategy (SaMS).  Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for chloride associated with salt application from snow and ice management have been developed for the Accotink Creek watershed, located in Fairfax County and the City of Fairfax.  These TMDLs were approved 5/23/18.  The SaMS is intended to assist in the implementation of the Accotink Creek chloride TMDLs.  The SaMS aims to prepare a strategy that is capable of achieving the target chloride (salt) loads identified in the Accotink Creek TMDLs and that proactively addresses salt application in the broader surrounding region.  The project area for the SaMS includes Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Alexandria, Manassas, Manassas Park, Falls Church, and Fairfax.”

*          *          *

MEETINGS ON OTHER SPECIFIC TOPICS
(topics listed alphabetically) 

Agriculture

5/28/19, 10 a.m.: Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Agricultural Best Management Practices Cost-share Program Technical Advisory Committee/Animal Waste Subcommittee.  At the Virginia Department of Forestry, 900 Natural Resources Drive in Charlottesville.

Air-Water Connections

5/22/19, 6 p.m.: Air Pollution Control Board/ Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on a request for a permit amendment by Volvo Group North America, LLC’s New River Valley Plant, 4881 Cougar Trail Road in Dublin (Pulaski County).  At the Pulaski County Public Library, 60 West Third Street in Pulaski.  The applicant has applied for a significant permit amendment to modify the facility’s existing integrated cab and plastics paint line.  The permit addresses air pollutants that can eventually affect water resources, including particulates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Dams

5/23/19, 9:30 a.m.: Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Districts’ Dam Owner Workgroup.  At the Augusta County Government Center, 75 Government Center Lane in Verona.

Energy – Fossil Fuels

5/29/19, 10 a.m.: Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) ad hoc work group on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure.  At the Bank of America Building, 1111 East Main Street in Richmond.  This group was established to discuss approaches for addressing methane from leakage from natural gas infrastructure.  More information is available on the DEQ’s “Greenhouse Gases” Web page, https://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Air/GreenhouseGasPlan.aspx.

Land and Watershed Management

5/30/19, 10 a.m.: Marine Resources Commission public comment meeting regarding SJR 309 and submerged fiber optic cable protection.  At 380 Fenwick Road in Ft. Monroe (adjacent to the City of Hampton).  According to the Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) 309, passed by the 2019 Virginia General Assembly, requests the Commission to “study the feasibility of creating protection zones for submerged fiber optic cables located along Virginia’s shores.”  LIS Information on the joint resolution is available online at http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?191+sum+SJ309. 

Ports

5/21/19, 9 a.m.: Virginia Port Authority Board of Commissioners.  At 600 World Trade Center, 101 West Main Street in Norfolk.  On 5/20/19 at the same location, the board’s Growth and Operations Committee, Finance and Audit Committee, and Executive Committee meet at 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., and 5:15 p.m., respectively.

Scenic Rivers

5/21/19, 12 p.m.: Goose Creek Scenic River Advisory Committee.  At the Loudoun County Government Center in Leesburg.

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 5-13-19: Mallards

Virginia Water Radio’s latest episode, for the week of May 13, 2019, is “Mallards are Widespread, Well-known Waterfowl.”  The 4 min./11 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/05/episode-472-5-13-19-mallards-are.html, focuses on the (currently) most abundant duck in North America.

472 Image 4 Male Mallard USFWSMale Mallard, location unidentified, April 2008.  Photo by Erwin and Peggy Bauer, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library, online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/5184/rec/2, accessed 5-13-19.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

Virginia Water Status Report as of the end of April 2019, Plus a Look at Drought Nationally

Here is the Virginia Water Central News Grouper’s monthly water-status report on precipitation, stream flow, and drought, as of end of April 2019.  The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing the data and maps used in this post.  Icons for precipitation, stream flow, and drought are by George Wills of Blacksburg, Va. (https://www.etsy.com/people/BlacksburgArt).  For previous monthly water status reports, please see this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Water+Status.

Water status icon precipitation by George Wills

Here are National Weather Service (NWS) preliminary (still needing verification) precipitation totals for April 2019 at 12 Virginia or near-Virginia locations, along with the “normal” (three-decade average) for this month of the year at each location.  Also shown are the precipitation totals at each location for the previous 12 months and the annual precipitation normals for each location.  The values are in inches.

Location April

2019 Observed

Monthly Normal May 2018-

April 2019 Observed

Annual Normal
Blacksburg 4.38 3.48 51.87 40.89
Bluefield1 3.60 3.34 48.80 39.63
Bristol2 5.16 3.33 60.74 41.01
Charlottesville3 2.85 3.36 64.38 42.71
Danville 2.78 3.46 69.06 44.41
Lynchburg 4.02 3.31 64.39 41.57
Norfolk 3.24 3.41 58.32 46.53
Reagan National Airport4 2.24 3.06 68.10 39.74
Richmond 3.08 3.27 65.62 43.60
Roanoke 4.59 3.37 63.45 41.25
Wallops Island5 4.03 3.07 53.43 40.84
Washington-Dulles Airport6 2.82 3.47 69.85 41.54

Location notes
1 – The Bluefield location is the Mercer County, W. Va., airport, near the Va.-W.Va. state line.
2- The Bristol location is the Tri-Cities Airport in Tenn., about 20 miles from Bristol, Va./Tenn.
3 – The Charlottesville location is the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.
4 – Reagan National Airport is in Arlington County.
5 – Wallops Island is in Accomack County.
6 – Washington-Dulles Airport is in Loudoun County.

Precipitation sources:  Climate pages of the following National Weather Service Forecast Offices:
Blacksburg, Va. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=rnk);
Morristown, Tenn. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=mrx);|
Baltimore-Washington (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=lwx); and
Wakefield, Va. (https://w2.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=akq).

The normal values used by the National Weather Service (NWS) in these provisional reports are based on the period from 1981 to 2010.  The National Climatic Data Center released these normal values in July 2011.  For information on the normal values, see the National Climatic Data Center Web page at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/land-based-station-data/land-based-datasets/climate-normals.

For graphs of precipitation, visit the High Plains Regional Climate Center at https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps), where you can find maps of total precipitation and percent of normal precipitation for the past 7, 30, 60, or 90 days for all U.S. regions; or the NWS’ Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/precip/ for a map of precipitation nationwide or by state, with capability to show county boundaries, and archives available for specific days, months, or years.  Shown below are the preliminary maps of the percent-of-normal precipitation for the southeastern United States for the previous 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days, and for Virginia for the previous 30 days, all through April 30, 2019.  Please note that the scale is different for the 60-day map.

Precipperc30Apr30Precipperc60Apr30Precipperc90Apr30PrecipPercVA30Apr30 

Water status icon stream flow by George Wills
According to the U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia (online at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=mv01d&r=va&w=map), monthly average stream flow values for April 2019 at 161 stream gages in Virginia and just beyond the state border were as follows, compared to the historical range for each given gage:
within the normal historical range – about 48% of gages;
below normal – about 1% of gages;
above normal – about 45% of gages;
much above normal (or higher) – about 6% of gages.

Shown below is the color-coded, flow-percentile map for this period, accessed at the Web site given in the paragraph above.  The chart below the map shows the color codes/percentile classes used by USGS to compared flows to historical records for the month.

Streams map April KEEP on deskto - Stream flow code graph

An overall look at Virginia streamflow conditions is provided in the USGS WaterWatch summary plot of daily average streamflow conditions, compared to historical records for any given date.  Below is the summary plot for 88 Virginia sites during the 45-day period ending May 6, 2019, accessed on May 8 at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?id=pa01d&sid=w__plot&r=va.

Streams Plot April

Water status icons groundwater by George Wills
Information on current groundwater levels in Virginia monitoring wells is available from the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System, online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/current/?type=gw; and from the USGS Climate Response Network, online at http://groundwaterwatch.usgs.gov/net/ogwnetwork.asp?ncd=crn (at that page, you can find a national map showing the status of groundwater monitoring wells compared to historical values).

Water status icon drought watch by George Wills

DROUGHT IN VIRGINIA

The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor map from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/) for April 30, 2019, categorized Virginia as drought-free.  The Commonwealth has been essentially drought-free since the June 5, 2018, Drought Monitor report, except for a 0.57% abnormally dry rating in the July 17, 2018, report and a 0.01% abnormally dry rating in the June 26, 2018, report.

Drought Monitor categories are as follows:
D0 = abnormally dry;
D1 = moderate drought;
D2 = severe drought;
D3 = extreme drought;
D4 = exceptional drought.

The Drought Monitor notes that it “focuses on broad-scale conditions [and] local conditions may vary.”

For comparison, here are Virginia ratings from previous Drought Monitors from about one month, two months, three months, and one year ago:
3/26/19 – drought-free;
2/26/19 – drought-free;
1/29/19 – drought-free;
5/1/18 – 28.5% abnormally dry or worse; 6.0% moderate drought.

In April 2019, the Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force (DMTF), a collaboration of state and federal agencies, issued its most recent report.  At that time, the DMTF stated that it would monitor conditions and meet again when conditions warrant another report.  A link to the April 2019 report, along with other current drought-status information, is available online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx.  The DMTF’s reports typically include information from some or all of the following agencies: University of Virginia Climatology Office, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Virginia departments of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Health, and Environmental Quality.  Following is the summary from the April 2019 report, and a map identifying the Drought Evaluation Regions used by the DMTF.

“The Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force (DMTF) met on Tuesday, April 16, 2019 to discuss the status of drought monitoring and hydrologic conditions in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  During the past year, precipitation fell across Virginia at near-record to record levels….  Consequently, groundwater levels and reservoir levels are above normal to well above normal.  Streamflows are at normal to above-normal levels across nearly the entire Commonwealth. High base flows in the streams (due to continued higher-than-normal groundwater levels) are directly related to above normal rainfall over recent months.  Hydrologic conditions, both currently and over the recent past, indicate little likelihood for hydrologic drought during the upcoming summer and fall months.  Variations in rainfall during these months, however, could result in rainfall deficits that can affect crop resources (agricultural drought)

“The current U. S. Seasonal Drought Outlook for the period through July 31, 2019 (released April 18, 2019) indicated no drought likelihood in Virginia.”

Drought Evaluation Regions

The DMTF also produces a map rating drought-status indicators, also online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought/CurrentDroughtConditionsMap.aspx.  Shown below is the map for April 23, 2019 (the one available on May 1, 2019).  The status-indicator abbreviations on that map are as follows: GW = groundwater levels, Prcp = precipitation deficits, Res – reservoir storage, and Flow = stream flow conditions.  For each region of Virginia, the indicators are color coded for “normal,” “watch,” “warning,” or “emergency conditions.”
Drought VA Apr23DROUGHT ELSEWHERE

The April 30, 2019, U.S. Drought Monitor categorized about 10.4% of the United States (including all or parts of 21 states plus Puerto Rico) as being abnormally dry or worse; this was the lowest nationwide percentage of abnormally dry-or-worse conditions since the beginning of the Drought Monitor in January 2000.  The Drought Monitor categorized about 0.5% of the country (including parts of 3 states), as being in severe drought or worse (categories D2, D3, and D4); this was the lowest nationwide percentage of severe-or-worse drought since Drought Monitor began in January 2007.  (The highest percentage in the severe-or-worse categories reported by the Drought Monitor since it began in 2000 was 38.5% of the country for the week of August 7, 2012.)

The nationwide percentages for abnormally dry or worse (categories D0-D4) and severe or worse (categories D2-D4) in the previous three months and one year ago were as follows:
3/26/19– 16.5% abnormally dry or worse; 1.0% severe drought or worse;
2/26/19 – 23.4% abnormally dry or worse; 3.5% severe drought or worse;
1/29/19 – 26.1% abnormally dry or worse; 5.8% severe drought or worse;
5/1/18 – 37.5% abnormally dry or worse; 13.6% severe drought or worse.

90-DAY DROUGHT OUTLOOK

For a look ahead, the National Weather Service/Climate Prediction Center’s “U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook” is available at http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/sdo_summary.php.  Shown below is the outlook map available on May 1, 2019.

Drought Outlook US

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 5-6-19: A Hawkeye State Model of Water Education for Youth

Virginia Water Radio’s latest episode, for the week of May 6, 2019, is “Tuning in to Water Education at Iowa’s Water Rocks! Program.”  The 5 min./10 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/05/episode-471-5-6-19-tuning-in-to-water.html, is one of a series of occasional episodes on water-related programs outside of Virginia, focusing on an Iowa State University water-education program for youth.  The episode features some of the water-related songs that are part of the variety of learning tools available through the Water Rocks! program.

471 Image 2 Water Rocks trailerOne of the Iowa Rocks! program’s traveling conservation trailers.  Photo accessed online at https://www.waterrocks.org/, used with permission of Jacqueline Comito, program executive director.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!

On Virginia Water Radio for the Week of 4-29-19: Weather Watches, Warnings, and Other Messages

Virginia Water Radio’s latest episode, for the week of April 29, 2019, is “Getting the Weather Message.”  (This is a revised repeat of an episode from April 2012. )  The 4 min./31 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2019/04/episode-470-4-29-19-getting-weather.html, focuses on the types of messages used by the National Weather Service.  It features excerpts from NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts on April 19, 2019, when Virginia experienced at least 15 confirmed tornadoes.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!