Virginia Water-related Government Meetings for July 27-August 9, 2017

For more information, click on underlined meeting dates. Click here for the Commonwealth Calendar listing of all government meetings open to the public, and here for the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall listing of all government meetings of a regulatory nature.

For other, non-governmental, events, please see the Water Central News Grouper post, Quick Guide to Virginia Water-related Events.

REGULAR MEETINGS OF STATEWIDE BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

7/27/17, 9:30 a.m.: Board for Waterworks and Wastewater Works Operators and Onsite Sewage System Professionals.  At the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation, 9960 Mayland Drive in Richmond.  The board’s Education and Training Committee meets at 9 a.m. that day at the same location.

7/29/17, 11 a.m.: Cave Board.  At the Staunton Public Library, 1 Churchville Avenue in Staunton.

7/31/17, 10 a.m.: Board for Waste Management Facility Operators. At the Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation, 9960 Mayland Drive in Richmond .

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VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY WATER-RELATED MEETINGS

For meetings of legislative committees and commissions, see http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?171+oth+MTG.  Links to information about General Assembly commissions, councils, and special interim committees coordinated by the Division of Legislative Services are available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html.

8/2/17, 10 a.m.: Commission on Electric Utility Regulation.  Senate Room 3, Capitol Building, 1000 Bank Street in Richmond.  More information on the commission is available online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions/eur.htm.

8/9/17, 10 a.m.: Joint Commission on Technology and Science.  House Room 1, Capitol Building, 1000 Bank Street in Richmond.

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MEETINGS ABOUT TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY LOADS (or TMDLs) for IMPAIRED WATERS

For more information about TMDLs in Virginia, click here for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality TMDL Web site; click on “Public Notices” in the menu to the left to access upcoming meetings and public-comment periods.  A search tool to find approved TMDL reports is available at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/TMDL/TMDLDevelopment/ApprovedTMDLReports.aspx.

8/1/17, 2 p.m., on the development of a watershed plan for aquatic life (benthic) impairment in Cunningham Creek and its tributaries plus bacterial impairment in Middle Ford Cunningham Creek, all located in the James River basin in Fluvanna County.  At the Fluvanna County Public Library, 214 Commons Boulevard in Palmyra.  These waterways were the subject of a TMDL study that began in February 2016, but in May 2017 the TMDL study was suspended and a watershed plan will be developed instead.

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MEETINGS ON OTHER SPECIFIC TOPICS
(topics listed alphabetically)

Air-Water Connections
8/3/17, 9:30 a.m.: Air Pollution Control Board/Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Regulatory Adivsory Committee on Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Trading Regulation.  At the DEQ Main Office, 629 East Main Street in Richmond.  This is the first meeting of the committee formed to advise the DEQ on the development of proposed regulatory amendments concerning CO2 trading.  Its formation follows Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s Executive Directive 11 (May 2017) that instructed the DEQ to begin a process of developing regulations to reduce carbon emissions from electric power plants.  Executive Directive 11 is available online (as a PDF) at http://governor.virginia.gov/media/9155/ed-11-reducing-carbon-dioxide-emissions-from-electric-power-facilities-and-growing-virginias-clean-energy-economy.pdf].  A Notice of Intended Regulatory Action was published in the Virginia Register of Regulations on June 26, 2017.  The pertinent section of the Virginia Administrative Code is 9 VAC 5-140.   More information on this regulatory action is available online at http://townhall.virginia.gov/L/viewaction.cfm?actionid=4818.  According to the “Action Summary” at that Web site, “[t]he purpose of the proposed action is to develop a regulation, in accordance with Executive Directive 11 (2017), ‘Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electric Power Facilities and Growing Virginia’s Clean Energy Economy,’ that (i) ensures that Virginia is trading-ready to allow for the use of market-based mechanisms and the trading of carbon dioxide (CO2) allowances through a multi-state trading program, and (ii) establishes abatement mechanisms that provide for a corresponding level of stringency to CO2 limits imposed in other states with such limits.”

Energy – Fossil Fuels
8/7/17, 6 p.m.: State Water Control Board/Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on draft Section 401 Certification for the proposed Atlantic Coast natural gas pipeline.  At James Madison University, Festival Conference and Student Center Grand Ballroom, 1301 Carrier Drive in Harrisonburg.  A second public hearing will be held 8/10/17, 6 p.m., at Longwood University, Jarman Auditorium, 201 High Street in Farmville.  According to the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall notice for these meetings, the DEQ is considering draft Section 401 Certification [referring to Section 401 of the federal Clean Water Act] for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline project.  The draft certification “would establish additional conditions for activities in upland areas that are located near state waters and that may indirectly affect state water along the route of the proposed pipeline.  The conditions address, among other things, engineering and best management practices for steep slopes and slide prone areas; environmental monitoring and inspections; and development and implementation of plans and procedures for karst mitigation, spill prevention control, water quality monitoring, protection of riparian buffers, protection of water quality from acid forming materials, protection of public water supplies, horizontal directional drilling, hydrostatic testing, and dust control activities.”  The public comment period for the draft certification runs July 3—August 22, 2017.  More information from the DEQ about water-related permitting for proposed natural gas pipelines is available online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/ProtectionRequirementsforPipelines.aspx.

8/8/17, 6 p.m.: State Water Control Board/Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on draft Section 401 Certification for the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline.  At Radford University, Preston/Bondurant Auditorium, 801 East Main Street in Radford.  A second public hearing will be 8/9/17, 6 p.m., at Chatham High School Auditorium, 100 Cavalier Circle in Chatham (Pittsylvania County).  According to the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall notice for these meetings, the DEQ is considering draft Section 401 Certification [referring to Section 401 of the federal Clean Water Act] for the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline.  The draft certification “would establish additional conditions for activities in upland areas that are located near state waters and that may indirectly affect state water along the route of the proposed pipeline. The conditions address, among other things, engineering and best management practices for steep slopes and slide prone areas; environmental monitoring and inspections; and development and implementation of plans and procedures for karst mitigation, spill prevention control, water quality monitoring, protection of riparian buffers, protection of water quality from acid forming materials, protection of public water supplies, hydrostatic testing, and dust control activities.”  The public comment period for the draft certification runs July 3—August 22, 2017.  More information from the DEQ about water-related permitting for proposed natural gas pipelines is available online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/ProtectionRequirementsforPipelines.aspx.

Infrastructure Construction Funding
7/27/17, 9 a.m.: Virginia Department of Health (VDH) public comment session on Fiscal Year 2018 Intended Use Plan for the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund Program.  At the VDH Office of Drinking Water, 109 Governor Street, 6th Floor, in Richmond.  The program provides assistance to public water systems for capital improvement projects to help meet public health protection objectives of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act.  According to the VDH’s Web site on the Intended Use Plan for 2018 (online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/drinking-water/office-of-drinking-water/financial-construction/drinking-water-state-revolving-fund-program/): “Under the Safe Drinking Water Act, Congress authorizes capitalization grants to the states through the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund Program (DWSRF).  As part of the annual DWSRF grant application process Virginia seeks meaningful public involvement through input, review, and comments.  The VDH’s Office of Drinking Water (ODW) has prepared a draft Intended Use Plan (IUP) that explains the goals of the program, funding priorities, how VDH intends to use the grant funds, and other important information submitted from the funding requests and set-aside suggestions.”  More information about drinking water funding programs is available online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/drinking-water/financial-construction-assistance-programs/.

Waste Management – Solid Waste
7/27/17, 7 p.m.: Waste Management Board/Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) public hearing on a draft permit modification for Old Dominion Sanitary Landfill in Henrico County, regarding increasing the landfill’s capacity.  At Dorey Park Recreation Center, 2999 Darbytown Road in Henrico.  The public comment period runs 6/22/17 to 8/11/17.

F-2 Tornado on Kent Island, Maryland, on July 24, 2017

Following are some sources of information on the F-2 tornado (wind speeds 111 to 135 miles per hour) that in the early morning hours of July 24, 2017, cut a swath cross Kent Island, Maryland, that was two miles long and 150 yards wide at its maximum.  Kent Island, part of Queen Anne’s County, is in the Chesapeake Bay at the eastern end of the U.S. Rt. 50/Chesapeake Bay Bridge.  The tornado, the first F-2 tornado on Maryland’s Eastern Shore since 2002 (according to a Washington Post report) occurred during a series of severe storms in Maryland and several other Middle Atlantic states.

National Weather Service Public Information Statement, 7/24/17, 3:27 p.m. EDT.

Weather Service confirms Eastern Shore tornado — EF-2 with 125-mph winds, Washington Post, 7/24/17.

It’s devastating’: Tornado causes extensive damage on Kent Island, Baltimore Sun, 7/24/17.

Cleanup continues: Tornado damage on Kent Island ‘like a war zone’, WTOP Washington, 7/25/17.

From the National Weather Service public information statement listed above, here are the six tornado wind-speed categories from the Enhanced Fujita Scale:
EF0 – 65 to 85 mph;
EF1 – 86 to 110 mph
EF2 – 111 to 135 mph;
EF3 – 136 to 165 mph;
EF4 – 166 to 200 mph;
EF5 – greater than 200 mph.

For more information on classifying tornadoes, see the NOAA/Storm Prediction Center, “Enhanced F Scale for Tornado Damage,” online at http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/ef-scale.html.

Economic Impact of Virginia’s Agriculture and Forestry Described in May 2017 Report

In May 2017,  the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia released “The Economic Impact of Virginia’s Agriculture and Forest Industries.”  The 71-page report, written by Terance J. Rephann, is available online (as of July 2017) at the the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Web site, http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/; the Virginia Department of Forestry Web site, http://www.dof.virginia.gov/; or directly (as a PDF) at http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/pdf/weldoncooper2017.pdf.

Following are some main findings, from the Study Highlights (page 1), all as of in 2015. the base year used for the study.
*Total economic impact of agriculture and forestry-related industries in Virginia was over $91 billion ($70 billion in agriculture, $21 billion in forestry).
*Total employment impact was 442,260 employees (8.7 percent of total state employment) (334,000 in agriculture, 107,900 in forestry).
*Total value-added impact was $45.5 billion (9.5 percent of state gross domestic product) ($36.2 billion in agriculture, $9.3 billion in forestry).
*Agricultural economic impacts were “geographically diffuse. The largest clusters of agricultural-related industry employment impact were located in the Shenandoah Valley, Northern Virginia, and Central Virginia. The largest forestry-related economic impacts tended to be somewhat more geographically concentrated in the Southside region and communities with pulp and paper mills such as Alleghany County and Covington City.”
*Total economic impact of agriculture and forestry-related industry exports was approximately 47,000 jobs (one in nine farm jobs), $4.6 billion in value-added, and nearly $9 billion in total output.
*Results from other recent studies indicate that Virginia agricultural tourism and forest recreation account for “millions of visitors and billions of dollars of tourism-related spending and economic impact each year.”
*Agriculture and forestry landscapes provide substantial environmental and other societal benefits.  “Forests improve air and water quality, mitigate flood vulnerability, provide wildlife habitat, and aid biodiversity.  Rural landscapes provide scenic amenities that contribute to the quality of life.  The value of air and water environmental services provided by farmland and forestland likely amounts to at least several billion dollars each year.”

Healthy Watersheds Forest Retention Project Report Released in June 2017

On June 30, 2017, a project team from the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF), the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and the Rappahannock River Basin Commission released “Healthy Watersheds Forest Retention Project Phases 1 and 2 Final Report.”

The report’s title page states that the project is “a Virginia and Pennsylvania partnership focused on expanding the use of forestland to meet Chesapeake Bay Watershed goals from the perspective of the local leaders who are responsible for making it happen.”  The Acknowledgments (page 8) describe the report as an effort “to answer two questions: Can we quantify the contribution of forestland in economic terms toward achieving Chesapeake Bay cleanup goals [under the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, or TMDL, published by the U.S. EPA in 2010]; and if the value is significant, what needs to be done to incentivize forestland retention so that contribution is maximized?”  The report (page 10) asserts that it “validated the working hypothesis” that localities can realize “substantial savings” from retaining or increasing forestlands that, in turn, reduce the inputs of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediments to Chesapeake Bay waters.

The report includes sections on tax and fiscal policy tools that state and local governments can use to promote forestland.  A forestland ecosystem services literature review, prepared by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, is included as Appendix B of the report.

The 199-page report is available online at the VDOF main Web page, http://www.dof.virginia.gov/, as of July 2017; or click here for a direct link to a PDF of the report.

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Atlantic Coast Natural Gas Pipeline Issued by FERC on July 21, 2017

On July 21, 2017, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) staff issued its Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline project.  That document is available online at https://www.ferc.gov/industries/gas/enviro/eis/2017/07-21-17-FEIS.aspFERC’s overview of the document is copied below.

Following are links to several news accounts of the release of the Final EIS:
Environmental report on pipeline favorable for developers, Associated Press, as published by Richmond Times-Dispatch, 7/21/17.
One pipeline through VA clears hurdles; another in PA gets fined for violations, Bay Journal, 7/23/17.
Release of final analysis paves way for decision on proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline, Nelson County Times, 7/21/17.
Pipeline environmental statement: Most impacts will be ‘reduced to less-than-significant levels’, Richmond Times-Dispatch, 7/21/17.
Final environmental statement on pipeline released, Waynesboro News Virginian, 7/21/17.

For information on the Final EIS for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline (issued in June 2017), please see this Water Central News Grouper post.

For information on natural gas developments in Virginia overall since 2014, please see this Water Central News Grouper post.

FERC’s OVERVIEW AND MAIN CONCLUSIONS OF THE FINAL EIS
Accessed at https://www.ferc.gov/industries/gas/enviro/eis/2017/07-21-17-FEIS.asp on 7/25/17.

FERC Staff Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and Supply Header Project (CP15-554-000, -001; CP15-555-000; and CP15-556-000)
Issued: July 21, 2017

The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) has prepared a final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the projects proposed by Atlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC (Atlantic) in Docket Nos. CP15-554-000 and CP15-554-001; Dominion Energy Transmission, Inc. (DETI) in Docket No. CP15-555-000; and Atlantic and Piedmont Natural Gas. Co., Inc. (Piedmont) in Docket No. CP15-556-000.

Atlantic seeks a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (Certificate) from the Commission under section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Parts 157 and 284 of the Commission’s regulations to construct, operate, and maintain 333.4 miles of 42-inch-diameter mainline pipeline; 186.3 miles of 36-inch-diameter mainline pipeline; 83.4 miles of 20-inch-diameter lateral pipeline; 1.4 miles of 16-inch-diameter lateral pipeline; 3 new compressor stations totaling about 130,348 horsepower (hp); 9 meter and regulating (M&R) stations; 11 pig launcher and receiver facilities; and 41 valves in West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina as part of its proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP). The purpose of ACP is to deliver up to 1.5 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas to customers in Virginia and North Carolina.

DETI seeks a Certificate from the Commission under sections 7(b) and 7(c) of the NGA and Parts 157 and 284 of the Commission’s regulations to construct, operate, and maintain 37.5 miles of 30-inch-diameter pipeline; one M&R station; six valves; and four pig launcher or receiver facilities; and modify four existing compressor stations to provide an additional 69,200 hp in Pennsylvania and West Virginia as part of its proposed Supply Header Project (SHP). DETI is also requesting authorization to abandon in place two existing gathering compressor units at its existing Hastings Compressor Station in Wetzel County, West Virginia. The purpose of SHP is to provide customers access to the Dominion South Point hub in Pennsylvania along with other interconnecting natural gas suppliers, which allows access to multiple gas suppliers and markets to facilitate access to low cost natural gas.

Atlantic and Piedmont seek a Certificate from the Commission under section 7(c) of the NGA and Part 157 of the Commission’s regulations to lease capacity on Piedmont’s existing pipeline distribution system as part of their Capacity Lease Proposal. The purpose of the Capacity Lease Proposal is to provide service to North Carolina markets using additional transportation capacity on the Piedmont system. Because ACP, SHP, and the Capacity Lease Proposal are interrelated and connected actions, we analyzed them together in a single comprehensive EIS.

The EIS has been prepared in compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), under the Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Parts 1500–1508), and the FERC’s regulations at 18 CFR 380.

The conclusions and recommendations presented in the EIS are those of the FERC environmental staff. Input from the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Forest Service (FS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, and West Virginia Division of Natural Resources as cooperating agencies was considered during the development of the conclusions and recommendations in the EIS. The FS may adopt and use the EIS when it considers the issuance of a Special Use Permit to Atlantic for the portion of ACP that crosses the Monongahela National Forest and George Washington National Forest, and amendments to Land and Resource Management Plans to allow Atlantic to cross the forests. The cooperating agencies will present their own conclusions and recommendations in their respective permit authorizations and/or Record of Decision for the projects.

The FERC staff concludes that construction and operation of ACP and SHP would result in some adverse effects, such as impacts on steep slopes and adjacent waterbodies and associated aquatic resources; forested vegetation; Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed Indiana bat, northern long-eared bat, Roanoke logperch, Madison cave isopod, clubshell mussel, small whorled pogonia, and running buffalo clover; and karst, cave, subterranean habitat and the species associated with these habitats. Implementation of Atlantic and DETI’s respective impact avoidance, minimization, and mitigation measures, as well as their adherence to staff’s recommendations in the EIS would further avoid, minimize, and mitigate these impacts. Most, but not all of these impacts, would be reduced to less-than-significant levels. These determinations are based on a review of the information provided by Atlantic and DETI in their applications to the FERC and supplemental filings in response to staff’s environmental information requests; field investigations; scoping; literature research; alternatives analyses; and consultations with federal, state, and local agencies, and other stakeholders. Although many factors were considered in our determinations, the principal reasons are [the following]:
*Atlantic and DETI would minimize impacts on the natural and human environments during construction and operation of their facilities by implementing the numerous measures described in their respective construction and restoration plans;
*all of the proposed facilities would be constructed and operated in compliance with federal standards, requirements, and thresholds including U.S. Department of Transportation materials requirements and EPA air emissions standards;
*Atlantic would complete a Construction, Operation, and Maintenance Plan that includes additional measures to minimize impacts on environmental resources on National Forest System lands, and the FS’ Special Use Permit process for Atlantic’s easement over federal lands would provide terms and conditions for construction and operation;
*a high level of public participation was achieved during the pre-filing and post application review processes and helped inform our analysis;
*environmental justice populations would not be disproportionately affected by the projects;
*Atlantic and DETI would implement a steep slope management program and slip avoidance, identification, prevention, and remediation plan to minimize erosion and landslide potential in steep slope areas;
*the horizontal directional drill crossing method would be utilized for most major waterbodies, the majority of other waterbodies would be crossed using dry crossing methods, and Atlantic and DETI would be required to obtain applicable permits and provide mitigation for unavoidable impacts on waterbodies and wetlands through coordination with the USACE and state regulatory agencies;
*the FERC staff would complete the process of complying with the ESA prior to any construction, and the FWS would issue biological opinions that include additional conservation measures, as needed, to assure that ACP and SHP would not jeopardize the continued existence of any species under their jurisdiction and would not adversely modify or destroy designated critical habitat;
*the FERC staff would complete the process of complying with section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and implementing the regulations at 36 CFR 800 prior to allowing any construction to begin; and
*environmental inspection and monitoring programs would ensure compliance with all construction and mitigation measures that become conditions of the FERC authorizations and other approvals.

In addition, the FERC staff and cooperating agencies developed site-specific mitigation measures that Atlantic and DETI should implement to further reduce the environmental impacts that would otherwise result from construction and operation of their projects. The FERC staff determined that these measures are necessary to reduce the adverse impacts associated with the projects, and in part, are basing conclusions on implementation of these measures. These additional measures are listed as recommended conditions in section 5.2 of the EIS.

Virginia Precipitation and Stream Flow for the 7-day Period Ending July 24, 2017, Plus an Overview of Flooding Nationwide

Below are several items summarizing recent precipitation and stream flow:

  1. Images showing precipitation in Virginia and other areas of the United States, and stream flow in Virginia, over the seven-day period ending July 24, 2017 (information available as of July 25).
  2. Flooding overview maps for Virginia and nationwide, as of July 25.

The Virginia Water Resources Research Center thanks the agencies mentioned below for providing precipitation and stream-flow information and images. For the current month’s other weekly reports on stream flow and precipitation, please see the News Grouper posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Virginia+Precipitation.

For monthly reviews of precipitation, stream flow, and drought, please see the posts available at this link: https://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/?s=Monthly+Water+Status.

For more information on current and historical surface-water and groundwater conditions in Virginia, please see the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Virginia Science Center’s Web site, http://va.water.usgs.gov/.

GAGE Big Otter River near Ervington Rt 682 Campbell County Jun15 2017

July 2017 Gaging Station of the Month:  Big Otter River near Evington in Campbell County, Va., June 15, 2017.  U.S. Geological Survey information from this gage is online at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/inventory/?site_no=02061500.

Precipitation

The following two color-coded maps show southeastern U.S. precipitation amounts (top map) and the percent of normal precipitation compared to normal for this period of the year (bottom map) over the seven-day period ending July 24, 2017.  As of that date, these data were provisional (needing to be verified for accuracy and subject to possible revision).  The maps were accessed from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Southeast Regional Climate Center, located at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill; online at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps.

precip Jul24precip perc Jul24

Another source of precipitation data is the National Weather Service’s Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, online at http://water.weather.gov/precip/.  The site provides maps showing precipitation nationwide or by state for specific days, months, or years.  The site also has the capability to show county boundaries, and other map layers available include river flood forecasts and current flood/severe weather warnings.  Shown below is the continental U.S. 7-day precipitation map as of 8 a.m. EDT on 7/25/17.  Please note that UTC, the time shown on the maps at the site, is four hours ahead of Eastern Daylight Time and five hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time.

precip US Jul25

Stream Flow

Seven-day-average Virginia stream flows at gaging stations as of July 24, 2017, are indicated in the map below, from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) WaterWatch for Virginia, accessed online at http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa07d&r=va&w=map.  The map’s color-coded dots compare the previous week’s average stream flows to the normal flow levels for that week over the historical record for each gaging station.  The color codes/percentile classes used by USGS are as shown in the chart following the map.  Note: Additional gaging stations (such as for reservoirs or for inactive sites) are shown on maps available at the USGS’ National Water Information System Mapper, online at https://maps.waterdata.usgs.gov/mapper/index.html.

streams Jul24

stream codes
Flooding Overview

As of about 10 a.m. EDT on July 25, 2017, six stream-gaging stations in or near Virginia were either experiencing flooding or near flood stage, according to the National Weather Service’s Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service’s (AHPS) map of river levels relative to flood stage (color-coded) for Virginia and nearby areas.  The AHPS map for Virginia is shown below, along with the nationwide map as of the same time.  The maps are available online at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/forecasts.php; at that site, one can select Virginia or any other state of interest.

flooding VA Jul25

flooding uS Jul25

On Virginia Water Radio for 7-24-17: A Brief Introduction to the Huge Subject of Water Quality

Virginia Water Radio’s episode for the week of July 24, 2017, is “The Complicated Challenge of Cleaner Water.”  The 4 min./33 sec. episode, available online at http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/2017/07/episode-378-7-24-17-complicated.html, is a basic introduction to water quality concepts and the water-quality governmental framework in Virginia.

Virginia Water Radio’s is a weekly broadcast/podcast produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.  The home page is http://www.virginiawaterradio.org.  Have a listen or two!